Category Archives: Digital marketing

Goldfish secure exclusive deal with Santa

MEDIA RELEASE                                         GoldfishandQuvu

GOLDFISH AGREE DEAL WITH SANTA CLAUS TO BE HIS EXCLUSIVE TELECOMS PROVIDER FOR ‘SANTA’S CHRISTMAS HOTLINE’

The contract includes Santa using QUVU, Goldfish’s cloud-based contact centre system, to handle all the calls from Irish children to the elves at his Lapland call centre.

9th December, 2016; Dublin, Ireland: Christmas has come early for Irish telecoms firm Goldfish.ie, which has agreed a groundbreaking deal with Santa Claus to be his exclusive telecoms provider. The deal includes the set up and operation of ‘Santa’s Christmas Hotline’ and provision of Quvu to manage the elves in his Lapland call centre.

‘Santa’s Christmas Hotline’ is the first-time Santa has used the power of cloud telecoms to provide a number for boys and girls to call him direct, to tell him what they’d like for Christmas. This unique deal is the first of its kind in the history of Christmas. It means children no longer have to write a letter to Santa, now that they can him direct in his new call centre in the North Pole, on free phone 1800 828 000.

Continue reading

Keep It Simple, Stupid – Trumps Two Syllable Mantra

Donald Trump stupid

One day I will get around to writing an article about the day I met Donald Trump, in his office, in Trump Tower on 5th Avenue in New York. But, until then I’ve been writing about some of the great insights gleamed from The Sales & Marketing Summit. Last week I focused on how Charles Darwin was an accidental web designer. This week I’d like to focus on how simple Donald Trump is :)

The need for simplicity was a re-occurring theme during the Summit and something that has been preached by marketers since the dawn of the sector. You are probably familiar with the acronym in the title of this article KISS i.e. ‘keep it simple, stupid’, which has been around since the 1960s (when it was first invented by an engineer on the Lockheed spy plane). It is just as important fifty years later and maybe more so in the digital age, where you can be restricted to only 140 characters.

Like him or, more than likely, loath him, there is no denying that Trump is a master communicator. Trump’s success was covered in a great presentation at the Summit by Marshall Kingston, Brand Manager at Kepak.

Marshall pointed out that Trump resonates with people because he keeps things simple. This applies to not only what he says, but how he says it. He goes to great lengths to keep things as simple as possible, so much so that he rarely even uses words of more than two syllables. Ironically Mexico  and America are some of the few three syllable words he says. It’s true too, watch one of his speeches and count his words of more than two syllables. Other than names you’ll struggle to find them. I can’t believe I never noticed this.

Keeping it simple is one of the most important, if not THE most important, rules of communication. Trump ensures that by keeping what he says simple, the result is that as many people as possible can understand him. This is why he is such a hit with working class Republicans and those that are less-educated. He is probably one of the few politicians they understand because he doesn’t try and make himself look, and sound, intelligent, by using complicated phrases or words; just the opposite in fact.

Trump’s approach to communication can be summed up beautifully by one of his most famous sayings, which he loves repeating. He’s famous for saying that he“used to call people incompetent, but now he just calls them stupid”. The term ‘incompetent’ is ambiguous and subjective, because different people will have different views on what they judge to be incompetent. But everyone knows what stupid means, so there’s no confusion – it a hit with people. It also means he’s gone from using a four syllable word to a two syllable word. Genius.

Over my career I have always stood by the mantra that you should never use three words when two will suffice. I suppose this can also apply to syllables too.

Simon Palmer, Marketing and PR and Goldfish.ie

 

 

 

Charles Darwin the accidental web-designer

business telecoms

I was at the Sales and Marketing Summit in Dublin this week. It was held in the RDS alongside Tech Connect, which is attempting to fill part of the very large gap left by the Web Summit. The good weather afforded by this time of year was certainly an advantage and there was a great line up of speakers, with some excellent case studies to discuss.

It was fascinating hear about the different techniques people use for digital marketing. What has worked and, just as important, what has not worked. There were some common themes that kept emerging during the day, which I thought it would be helpful to summarise in a series of articles.

One presentation that I loved was by a Frenchman called Louis Grenier, who is fighting the good fight helping organisations improve their websites in order to boost sales. He started his presentation with an image of a statue of Charles Darwin, which thoroughly confused the audience and made them chuckle when the first words he said were: “I suppose you are wondering why the fuck I have put an image of Charles Darwin on the screen for a presentation on web design?”

Why indeed. After all, why would a nineteenth century naturalist be relevant to 21st century website design? Well, it turns out he is and it is because of lions. Yes lions. Mostly due to the way the pesky creatures would creep up behind us before they pounced on us.

The result of this big-cat skullduggery was that humans evolved their peripheral vision. Well, the ones that didn’t get eaten did. So much so that we can often see things on the periphery, before we see things directly in front us. This is why the most important elements on a website should always be around the edge of the screen, as this is where we see things first.

I can’t remember if this was part of Grenier’s presentation, or another one I saw, but A/B testing has also shown that we see faces first when we are presented with a new page. This allows organisations to use faces to direct a user towards important elements of the webpage i.e. have the face looking at a sign-up page.

More so, we see faces that are looking at us first, which is probably also related to protecting ourselves during evolution. Faces in adverts that look directly at the viewer are more likely to be clicked on, than faces that are looking at something else e.g. a laptop screen in the advert. Stock photos also perform worse, so create your own.

Lastly businesses need to repeat messages throughout a website, with the main USPs repeated on every page if possible. Grenier said that this is because you will have probably forgotten 80% of this article within two days and you will have already started to forget parts. Just don’t forget to look out for those lions.

Update: after I posted this article Louis very kindly added his presentation in the comments below: to view it please click here.

Simon Palmer, Marketing and PR at Goldfish.ie: the provider of low-cost cloud-based business telecoms, call recording and QuVu, the only contact centre management software you will ever need.